Archive for the ‘Strictly Lebanese’ Category

There is no denying, Donald Trump is a very strong Candidate to become the next U.S. President. Trump has placed Walid Phares, a long time guest on Lebanese political shows, as his consultant on Foreign Policy. Republican U.S. Representative for California’s 49th congressional district, Darrell Issa, has also endorsed Donald Trump. Recently, at the Republican National Convention, Thomas Barrack, spoke about his […]


Freakonomics recently has a discussion with Stephen Dubner had on an airplane. He was on his way to South Africa when fellow passenger Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author of The Black Swan and Antifragile, told him something remarkable: “If you look at ten or twenty or thirty of the richest countries around the world, among the richest people in those countries is […]


Part 1: The Company Part 2: The Deep State


The Economist summarizes that “business people from Lebanon fare better abroad than at home.” Link to the full article.


Guest post – Consensus decision-making is a group decision making process that seeks the consent, not necessarily agreement about the “favorite” choice of all participants. Consensus may be defined professionally as an acceptable resolution, one that can be supported, even if not the “favorite” of each individual.  Philosophical viewpoint The early Islamic philosopher, Al-Farabi (c. […]


Lebanese Enterpreneur Wissam Abdel Baki created Perk My City to help Lebanese local citizens report, view, or discuss the disorder in the streets of their city (currently only in Beyrouth). Violations such as abandoned vehicles, graffiti, litter, potholes, road blocks, sidewalk defects and any violation considered disgraceful to the city’s image. To report a violation, the Lebanese […]


It is hard as a Lebanese to be indifferent to the situation in Syria. Our blog has by enlarge been silent on the civil unrest, to our lifetime neighbour, Syria. An unrest in Syria, which is rather familiar among Lebanese whom had to traverse a 10-year demographical upheaval and civil war for us, as Lebanese, to realise how to finally live […]